→ The Soothing Promise Of Our Own Artisanal Internet

This vision of decentralization is more back-to-the-land than blockchain. If portals to the digital world are so exploitative, it asks, why not curate our own?

For consumers, this means forgoing convenience to control your ingredients: Read newsletters instead of News Feeds. Fall back to private group chats. Put the person back in personalization. Revert to reverse chron. Avoid virality. Buy your own serverStart a blogEmbrace anonymity. Own your own domain. Spend time on federated social networksrather than centralized ones. And when a big story breaks, consider saving your appetite for the slow-cooked, room-temp take.

Silicon Valley claims to be obsessed with data. (I blame Moneyball.) Take a look through any of the Silicon Valley rags or the tech section of the three newspapers still standing and you’ll see about three stories a day on data. How to get it. What to do with it. Who’s selling it to whom. Who needs it. How to protect yours. We’ve collected more data in the last ten years than we can process in the next hundred. No one can exactly remember why we’re collecting it, but everyone’s afraid to stop. Yet, with all this data at our disposal, we’ve created a garbage fire run by platforms of vitriol. Here’s some more data: we’re idiots.

Mike Monteiro: Herd Immunity

Aristocracy, slavery, patriarchy—these institutions were inhuman at their core. Each was an iron cage—and not always metaphorically. My point: deeply embedded social systems can be changed.

Yet when you look back, you realize these social cankers didn’t yield to utilitarian arguments. In each case, the strong, hard wedge that cracked the foundations of the prevailing social consensus wasn’t a pragmatic argument, but a moral one; not “this doesn’t work,” but “this is wrong.”

Institutions change when we change; when we trade resignation for indignation. It’s time to admit what we have long known to be true: our organizations are at odds with our values—not just in how they foul the environment, misuse our personal data, or corrupt the political process, but in how they treat the human beings whose lives they consume.

Gary Hamel’s Powerful Speech: Highlight of the Drucker Forum?

“As I’ve learned by studying and supporting the efforts of Enspiral, a group of New Zealand collective enterprises, solidarity is not the result of world-changingly good ideas; rather, it is the cause. There’s no paucity of solutions to our collective woes: from permaculture and the commons to consensus building and platform cooperatives. What we too often lack are the communities of people to organize and apply these solutions in the real world, from the bottom up. It doesn’t have to be this way.”

Winning Is for Losers: Enspiral and the Politics of Consent