Why Designers Don’t Want to Think When They Read
“ It’s clear that the currency of design discourse is really concerned with the “how” of design, not the “why” of it. As Teixeira and Braga write:
“ While designers tend to be skeptical of magic...

Why Designers Don’t Want to Think When They Read

It’s clear that the currency of design discourse is really concerned with the “how” of design, not the “why” of it. As Teixeira and Braga write:

While designers tend to be skeptical of magic formulas—we’re decidedly suspicious of self-help gurus, magic diets, or miraculous career advice—we have a surprisingly high tolerance for formulaic solutions when it comes to design.

Designers Are Defining Usability Too Narrowly

In The Hidden Life of Trees, Peter Wohlleben writes about how trees communicate with each other — sharing nutrients and even warning each other of impending dangers. So at our Network Convergence, we had many conversations about how we could learn from each other’s networks, observe patterns, share what has worked and hasn’t worked. Christine Lai, who is a collaboration catalyst and connector for networks like Village Global, The Ready, and Delivering Happiness, likes to call this “mycelium.” Mycelium are fungal threads that form networks underground in order to pass on water and nutrients in a symbiotic relationship with trees and other green plants. How can we be mycelium, then, and distinguish the lifeblood of thriving networks and the practices that make a difference, in order to share them with and nourish our wider ecosystem?

I love this metaphor. Exploring the ecosystem

The Problem with Patterns