Why Designers Don’t Want to Think When They Read
“ It’s clear that the currency of design discourse is really concerned with the “how” of design, not the “why” of it. As Teixeira and Braga write:
“ While designers tend to be skeptical of magic...

Why Designers Don’t Want to Think When They Read

It’s clear that the currency of design discourse is really concerned with the “how” of design, not the “why” of it. As Teixeira and Braga write:

While designers tend to be skeptical of magic formulas—we’re decidedly suspicious of self-help gurus, magic diets, or miraculous career advice—we have a surprisingly high tolerance for formulaic solutions when it comes to design.

Designers Are Defining Usability Too Narrowly

Designing user research

I wrote this blog post with Jess from People For Research, about how to design the best research experience:

There’s no one perfect way to do user research. Every method has its pros and cons. The key is to design the research process. Just like anything else you might design (a website, a gadget, or a garden) it’s about:

What
Defining the problem(s) you want to solve

How
Coming up with a solution that works within the constraints of time and budget

Read the rest at People For Research.

How to Plan for Design (and Why)

Upon reflection, I noticed when I explain what I do, I assume the why and focus on how. This is a bad habit. I also realized that why and how are inseparable. It’s impossible to understand the value of planning for design without grasping the nature of the work. To argue for user research, content strategy, information architecture, and participatory design, we must integrate why and how.

Why This Florida City Is Debranding Itself
“ The identity, which was designed by the local branding agency Parisleaf, is typography-heavy, with the simple word “Gainesville” as the most prominent part of the brand. It’s an effort to communicate a...

Why This Florida City Is Debranding Itself

The identity, which was designed by the local branding agency Parisleaf, is typography-heavy, with the simple word “Gainesville” as the most prominent part of the brand. It’s an effort to communicate a much deeper transformation the city is currently undergoing. Its goal? To become the most citizen-friendly city in the country, using the principles of human-centered design.

Three Takeaways from the Hawai’i Missile False Alarm

Three Takeaways from the Hawai’i Missile False Alarm