At present, the IOED [Illusion of Explanatory Depth] is profoundly pervasive given that we have infinite access to information, but consume information in a largely superficial fashion. A 2014 survey found that approximately six in ten Americans read news headlines and nothing more. Major geopolitical issues from civil wars in the Middle East to the latest climate change research advances are distilled into tweets, viral videos, memes, “explainer” websites, soundbites on comedy news shows, and daily e-newsletters that get inadvertently re-routed to the spam folder. We consume knowledge widely, but not deeply.

In the internet age, recall memory—the ability to spontaneously call information up in your mind—has become less necessary. It’s still good for bar trivia, or remembering your to-do list, but largely, Horvath says, what’s called recognition memory is more important. “So long as you know where that information is at and how to access it, then you don’t really need to recall it,” he says.

To Cut Car Pollution, Ask Drivers to ‘Think of Yourself’

To Cut Car Pollution, Ask Drivers to ‘Think of Yourself’

Reading Literature Makes Us Smarter and Nicer

Reading Literature Makes Us Smarter and Nicer