No Share Buttons on Mobile Sites (Except This One Weird Case)

No Share Buttons on Mobile Sites (Except This One Weird Case)

The customer is the new organization. On Facebook customers are marketing their perfect lives. On LinkedIn, they are marketing their perfect careers. On Google they are advertising, saying, hey I want to buy this, or I want to do that. People become a political party on Twitter. They become retailers on eBay. Organizations like to do market research on their customers, but today it is customers who are doing the research on organizations.

I definitely think – and this is an attitude that you see in forums like FYAD, and going back to usenet and IRC and stuff – that the internet is meant to be a playground and whenever people try to treat it purely as a place to make money, they are going to run into this sort of static.

I have this perverse theory that, in about ten years, sections of the internet will have become like the American inner cities of the 1980s. Like a John Carpenter film—where, among the ruins, there are fierce warrior gangs, all with their own complex codes and rules—and all shouting at each other. And everyone else will have fled to the suburbs of the internet, where you can move on and change the world. I think those suburbs are going to be the exciting, dynamic future of the internet. But to build them I think it will be necessary to leave the warrior trolls behind. And to move beyond the tech-utopianism that simply says that passing information around a network is a new form of democracy. That is naive, because it ignores the realities of power.

This.

This.